Don’t Blame Striking Workers, Blame MTC

SUNDAY COLUMN | How about blaming the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) on Monday morning when your car is sitting in traffic, instead of workers? Oh, you don’t know what or who MTC is? That’s exactly how they like it. Starting on Monday, the East Bay could be in the middle of one major traffic jam, but it is also a significant show of the area’s strength in the labor movement. Not only might BART workers hit the picket lines, but so too might AC Transit workers and Oakland city employees. If the progressive New York Times loved Oakland before, imagine their admiration when public workers shut down the region?

The hacks in the corporate media, of course, hardly disguise their disdain for workers. In the past week, the drumbeat has aimed at cajoling you into blaming public employees. It’s not about the issues of health care and pensions they report (you, of course, probably face the same problems at you private sector job, but never mind). Instead, it’s those striking workers who are going to gravely affect your life. The trick is dastardly and contains some of the same corporate media tricks used during the Occupy Oakland protests (I that case the line was these people protesting “need to get a job.)

However, here’s an alternate reading of the situation. If any group is to blame it’s MTC, the shadowy, half unelected and elected commission that oversees transportation in the Bay Area. They’re the same bunch of bureaucrats who fucked up the new Bay Bridge. Not only does MTC have problems with overseeing the region’s biggest public works projects, but it also has problems with planning. Why isn’t anybody questioning the supreme stupidity of allowing not one, but two labor contracts with BART and AC Transit workers to expire on the very same day. Add in Oakland public employees and talk about strength in numbers when it comes to negotiations between management and any one of the labor groups.

Oh, you don’t think management at BART and AC Transit have anything to do with MTC, at least, not officially, well keep thinking that way, because that’s their aim. How can you blame a group with no recognizable face? Conversely, the “bad guys” created by the corporate media at the behest of the One Percent look just like you and me and work just as hard. Now, just pay them so I can pay my $8.50 to get from the BART Fruitvale station to San Bruno.

Quotable
“You know what? I don’t know, maybe I should freaking run for mayor of this city and the more I think about it, the more and more I’m just waiting for a signal from God.”
Larry Reid, Oakland council member June 27 during the approval of rival’s budget plan.

The Week That Was
>>>Alameda Point’s forward: The Navy handed over 1,300 acres of prime waterfront real estate at Alameda Point this week, but trouble could lie beneath. The deal is a great opportunity for Alameda and also could be a beacon for shady deals and developers. The land below is also a toxic wasteland. Who knows what we’ll find in the ground or what creatures slithering above it.

>>>Budgets approved in Oakland, Alameda County: Oakland approved a new two-year, $2 billion budget this week with some contention between slightly differing proposals. Councilmembers Rebecca Kaplan and newbies Dan Kalb and Lynette Gibson McElhaney came out on top and may signal a new direction for the moribund council. The county also passed its own $2.7 billion budget. With an improving economy, the county was able to shrink an $80 million shortfall–the lowest in five years–without excruciating cuts. Workers even got a cost-of-living increase for the first time in five years.

>>>I do: Civil rights history was made with the U.S. Supreme Court striking down key provisions of the Defense of Marriage Act and leaving Proposition 8 to die on the vine. The seeds of the victory for society and LGBT community, as we all know, started in the Bay Area. At least, one East Bay official decided to tie the knot this weekend. Meanwhile, Hayward’s first openly gay elected official, former Councilman Kevin Dowling, said on Facebook that he’s still looking for “Mr. Right.”

>>>Nothing odd here, look away: Questions still linger as to why Eric Swalwell Sr. was sitting on the Alameda County civil grand jury for the last 10 months while his son was playing Camp Congress? In the meantime, a weak grand jury report hit none of Swalwell, Jr’s supporters, even though Alameda County Supervisor Scott Haggerty was sitting there like a dead duck following a long list of accusations by former chief of staff.

Tweet of the Week
“After deciding to adjourn in memory of Nelson Mandela, Oakland council discovers that he’s not dead. #oakmtg”
-@matthai, the San Francisco Chronicle’s Oakland City Hall beat reporter tweeting June 27. Matthai Kuruvila announced the same night that he’s leaving the paper for a new job at the city of Berkeley. He will be missed.

Best Reads
>>>Although some are equating the release of “Fruitvale Station,” the Oscar Grant film, to the ongoing Trayvon Martin shooting, the story is far more complicated. (Los Angeles Times, June 28.)

Voice of the People
“No one cares about the kids of Hayward. :(“
Anonymous, commenting June 29 on “How Hayward’s New Superintendent Wanted The Job, Quit The Job, Got The Job.”



Categories: AC Transit, Alameda Point, BART, budget, Eric Swalwell, labor, labor negotiations, Larry Reid, MTC, New York Times, Oakland, Oakland City Council, SEIU, strike

198 replies

  1. I do agree with most of the post at 9:48 PM on the 19th. My friends and I rely on Bart to get us places and we hope both sides give a little to come to agreement. I do check out the Citizen once in awhile and agree that the anti worker individual does try to dominate and instigate controversy. It's not often someone stands up to that individual for so long. I also agree that not all workers at Bart make salaries that are out of line with Bay Area living standards, as the electrical engineer points out. Most of us are upset however at the high salaries and pensions of the managers, which do seem out of line with Bay Area living standards. The pension spiking seems to be at the higher end of the management scale. Please no strike. Settle your differences.

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  2. Well, friends, the union whore is back. He's the previous two posts, and he keeps sticking to his imaginary person with his imaginary figures. Anything is possible when you spin a fairy tale.

    What's egregious though, is he has no respect for women, lesbians, or anyone who doesn't share his warped and twisted 'brain.' What's even more spectacular, he can't grasp the KPIX news poll that shows the public overwhelmingly opposed to his pathetic cry that it's big, bad management. Number one rule of union whores–seek to divide and try to conquer. Never mind that management is not the boogeyman, has no contract that is up in this go-around, if at all, and hasn't threatened to create the 'longest, bloodiest strike of BART since the 1970s.' Even when the unbiased, truthful numbers are staring him in the face, this whore for the union still stands his ground–all two inches surrounded by a sea of public opinion that casts the blame solely on his and his pathetic comrades' shoulders.

    After this strike starts, simple addition will take over. 40% already don't respect or trust the union. That will double to 80%, simple Gallop Poll logic. Add to that the 15% who have tuned out or are already predisposed to blaming the unions for stirring up this pot of shit, and that gets you to just under 100%, who know a crock of shit when they smell it. That is what will get us to BART becoming exempt from strikes in the future. This will be the final cycle when they can attempt to bully the public at large. The final nail will be driven into their coffins by them.

    We'll need to learn our 'friend's' name before this is over, because it will be due largely to his ineptitude for his unions that the public will be so blessed. At the appropriate time we'll offer this then to be union-reject a rousing chours of “For he's a jolly good [former] union whore!”

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  3. Troll- you use the same lines continually. This includes the Puerta(sic) Rican lesbian wife and I line. But, being an executive, it explains why you ALWAYS attack unions and the workers. You ALWAYS throw in the word whore in all your posts and NEVER blame management who are the biggest perk recipients and exploiters of PENSION SPIKING. You are the one who has the most posts on this string, and both of us know you are a single male who likes to bully people. LOL

    Troll- try and answer this REAL BART workers post. I have a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering. I make $50,000 a year. Do you think I'm overpaid? I am going to be out of pocket with my medical coverage around $2000 this year and I am healthy. Do you think I have a platinum health plan? The average BART retiree (except for management) draws a $21,000 pension. Could you live on $21,000 a year?

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  4. Compromise is the only solution!

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  5. Agree with above statement, and we need to crack down on pension spiking. Matier & Ross in a recent article said pension spiking has most prominently been done by management employees at BART by banking holiday, sick and vacation pay.

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  6. Thought we had flushed the turd down the toilet once and for all. Looks like it crawled back out. Oh well, it can't win this one and never will.

    The compromise will be EXEMPTION. Union whores are going down the tubes, big time.

    Well, friends, the union whore is back. He's the previous two posts, and he keeps sticking to his imaginary person with his imaginary figures. Anything is possible when you spin a fairy tale.

    What's egregious though, is he has no respect for women, lesbians, or anyone who doesn't share his warped and twisted 'brain.' What's even more spectacular, he can't grasp the KPIX news poll that shows the public overwhelmingly opposed to his pathetic cry that it's big, bad management. Number one rule of union whores–seek to divide and try to conquer. Never mind that management is not the boogeyman, has no contract that is up in this go-around, if at all, and hasn't threatened to create the 'longest, bloodiest strike of BART since the 1970s.' Even when the unbiased, truthful numbers are staring him in the face, this whore for the union still stands his ground–all two inches surrounded by a sea of public opinion that casts the blame solely on his and his pathetic comrades' shoulders.

    After this strike starts, simple addition will take over. 40% already don't respect or trust the union. That will double to 80%, simple Gallop Poll logic. Add to that the 15% who have tuned out or are already predisposed to blaming the unions for stirring up this pot of shit, and that gets you to just under 100%, who know a crock of shit when they smell it. That is what will get us to BART becoming exempt from strikes in the future. This will be the final cycle when they can attempt to bully the public at large. The final nail will be driven into their coffins by them.

    We'll need to learn our 'friend's' name before this is over, because it will be due largely to his ineptitude for his unions that the public will be so blessed. At the appropriate time we'll offer this then to be union-reject a rousing chours of “For he's a jolly good [former] union whore!”

    Like

  7. Notice the turd lives in a fantasy world. It never lists anything new. Just continues to paste its made up fake stories over and over and over again.

    What a loser this union whore turd is.

    Like

  8. Heard that union whore!

    BART workers' paychecks already outpace their peers'
    By Mike Rosenberg and Daniel J. Willis Mercury News
    Posted: 07/27/2013 04:00:00 PM PDT
    Updated: 07/29/2013 11:25:55 AM PDT

    San Francisco Bay Area 2012
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    While BART and its unions fight over employee pay raises with another strike looming in a week, a new analysis by this newspaper reveals the rail line's workers already have bigger paychecks than any of their peers.

    BART workers easily earned the most money on average last year among the 25 largest government agencies in the Bay Area, the newspaper's review of public employee payroll data shows. What's more, BART employees also topped the list of the highest-paid transit operators in California.

    And the results are not close. Even when eliminating high-paid police officers and executives, the average gross pay for the blue-collar BART union workers who are threatening another shutdown was $76,551 last year — more than the average employee made at any large school district from San Jose to Walnut Creek, any county from Santa Cruz to Contra Costa or any transit line from San Diego to Sacramento.

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  9. BART's top-paid train operator grossed $155,308, compared with the $109,450 that the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority paid its top light-rail driver. BART's best-paid janitor made $82,752 while the upscale Hillsborough City School District paid its top custodian $59,360. And BART's electrician with the highest paycheck made $149,957 — nearly twice the $79,878 that AC Transit's best-paid electrician made.

    The wages are under heightened scrutiny as BART and its labor unions on Tuesday enter their final week of negotiations, hoping to avert a second shutdown, Aug. 5, after a cooling-off period halted a 4½-day strike earlier this month. Both sides remain far apart on the key issues of worker pay and contributions to pensions and health care.

    Overall, BART's average employee — executives included — made nearly $30,000 more than employees at Los Angeles' transit line, and nearly $10,000 more than those at San Francisco Muni, the state's second-highest paid transit workers.

    BART workers argue their wages have
    BART Union members picket outside Caltrans building where contract negotiation continue on their third day of BART strike in Oakland, Calif., on Wednesday, July 3, 2013. (Ray Chavez/Bay Area News Group)
    remained flat for four years. They say they are worthy of their salaries, pointing to the agency's strong on-time performance, high rider satisfaction and their work maintaining one of the nation's most antiquated rail lines.

    “You buy a Mercedes, you get quality. You almost get what you pay for,” said Dennis Acma, 47, of Dublin, a power support controller at BART for the past seven years. “They're paying for that expertise. You got people who are dedicated that work here.”

    Despite the lack of recent wage increases, BART has not had trouble attracting — or retaining — people to fill their union jobs, such as station agent, train operator and maintenance worker, that typically require a high school diploma and a few years of general work experience.

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  10. Since 2007, BART has received nearly 65,000 job applications for about 1,800 line-level union openings. Only 6.8 percent of BART's blue-collar workforce left the job in the past year — half the average national turnover rate for public and private employers — and the typical union employee stays with BART for 13 years.

    The data show BART pay is above average partly because of favorable rules that allow workers to pile up lots of overtime and cash out unused sick and vacation time, which has helped some employees double their base salary. But BART and experts say it's also the result of previous managers caving to the public demand to avoid strikes by including regular pay bumps for decades, until 2009.

    “(BART unions) have a degree of leverage from a strike perspective that many other industries don't, and this is a classic example of them capitalizing on it,” said Christopher Thornberg, founding partner of Beacon Economics, a Los Angeles-based economics consulting firm. “If you ask me, it's a tiny bit short of blackmail: 'Give me the money or the commute's going to get it.' “

    Union employees say the cost of living in the Bay Area has soared and BART's revenue has surged to record levels. Plus, because of management's push to increase health care and pension premiums, employees stand to see their take-home pay go down without raises.

    And not all workers are highly paid. Last year, 830 part-time and full-time BART workers — or nearly one-quarter of the rail line's workforce — made less than the $62,680 median income in the San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont metropolitan area.

    Acma, the BART worker, said he's tired of people thinking they are drones who only push buttons and said the employees work hard, often on off-hours, holidays and weekends, for their money.

    “It's unfortunate that our jobs do hold the Bay Area hostage,” he said. “We're scrimping by, and sometimes the public treats us like we're above everybody else. We're not the 1-percenters.”

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  11. But BART says it needs to limit worker costs, which, as in most transit agencies, are the biggest expense in its budget. If overall compensation goes up, BART officials say, they will have to delay payments toward new rail cars and other equipment needed to increase service.

    Before state mediators earlier this month ordered both sides to keep their latest proposals secret, BART had offered a wage increase of 5 to 8 percent, depending on whether certain economic measures were met, over four years. That would push the average union gross pay to as much as $82,861 by 2017.

    Unions had countered with a pay increase of 20.1 percent over three years, which would increase their average total pay to $92,991 by 2016.

    The pay comes on top of the benefits BART workers earn, which are among the best in the Bay Area and have eaten up half the extra revenue the agency has collected in the past few years. Employees contribute nothing toward their pension and $92 a month toward health care.

    “I don't know if it's an urban myth or just a saying, that the BART contract is held up in union halls around the county as the gold standard,” BART spokeswoman Alicia Trost said. “We have to bring our compensation packages more in line with what others have. Years of protecting the employees have caught up with us.”

    Contact Mike Rosenberg at mrosenberg@mercurynews.com or 408-920-5705. Follow him at Twitter.com/RosenbergMerc.

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  12. Mommy, when I grow up I want to be a union whore, just like the turd who makes up his imaginary stories!

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  13. 11:43 It sounds like you want a strike. My wife and I want compromise, so we can get to work. Neither of us belong to a Union. I'm glad there are cooler heads than yours doing the negotiations. Compromise is the only viable solution.

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  14. You don't read. The compromise will be EXEMPTION, and if you weren't one of the laborites, you would understand that. BART will be going the way of police and fire, only way to go. Public realizes that that is what works best and is the only way to go.

    Nice try. Next time, put a little more work into it.

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  15. The Supreme Court of Calif. said public employees had the right to strike except for Police and Fire because of public safety concerns. Police and Fire were given mandated binding arbitration instead, which they love, because it has helped raise their salaries to astronomical highs. I'm sure BART would love to be treated like Police and Fire. Careful what you wish for! But, no one is talking in favor of that in Sacramento.

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  16. And there wish will soon come true. The public will be the winners when they go exempt!

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  17. Have you taken a look at Police and Fire salaries lately? How about their pension benefits? That's what happens when you have binding arbitration instead of collective bargaining. The arbitrators don't have to live with the results, and the public loses most of the time. I don't think you thought this through, or you don't know enough about arbitration and/or arbitrators.

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  18. When the public is made to endure the 'longest and bloodiest strike since the 1970s,' to quote the unions, exemption will look like a G-dsend.

    You prefer the status quo, which by the way if you go back every four years for the past 20, you will read that the threat of a strike ALWAYS happens. Some will say that's what happens in collective bargaining. Not true. Steve Hemminger, who oversees the MTC, rightly points out that ALL of the other transit districts in the state are able to 'get their shit together [my words; not his].' BART is the only exception, and it is why someone such as Don Perata [unions' biggest champion] said in the last go-around that he would consider exemption for the future. He might be gone, but there are enough savvy politicians around who, after a real strike happens, will jump on the band wagon so fast that it will make your head spin.

    This is one time too many that the unions have cried 'wolf!' They are about to get their comeuppance. It's not about labor, and it's not about management.

    IT'S ABOUT THE PUBLIC!!!

    As our friend Howard Beal said “We're mad as hell, and we're not going to take it anymore!”

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  19. Dream on–it won't happen anytime soon with Perez and Steinberg in charge in the Capitol. If you don't want a strike you have to pray Brown will declare a 60 day moratorium. That will give them more time to settle their differences. Remember the Unions, who you dislike, will come out way ahead with binding arbitration, as have public safety employees like police and fire.

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  20. The dream is about to become reality, 'friend!' All courtesy of the unions.

    By the way, both of the above are almost at the end of their capitol careers. If I'm not mistaken, both expire next year–due to term limits.

    IT'S ALL ABOUT THE PUBLIC!!!

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  21. If it's all about the public you don't want binding arbitration. Arbitrators almost always give cost of living increases; that's why police and fire costs have escalated so rapidly, and are costing us taxpayers dearly. I don't want a strike and I see settlement by compromise as the only realistic solution in the near term. Brown does have the power to call for a 60 day moratorium to help make that happen. We'll see what happens in the long term, but don't bet on the heavily Dem legislature to mandate binding arbitration.

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  24. The 'compromise' that you speak of is code for giving the unions exactly what they want. While the cop's away, let the unions clean out the store. Sorry. Not buying it. The unions are scared shitless that they will be cut off at the balls, and they should be.

    Police and fire would LOVE to be able to strike. They've said so repeatedly. You can continue to shill for labor, albeit under the radar, but the public won't go along with. Once “the longest and bloodiest BART strike since the 1970s” begins, you'll see the public crying for EXEMPTION like gangbusters. That's why even ol' Don Perata hisself spoke those very words four years ago. He was laying the groundwork when nobody else was paying attention.

    Exemption is the only way to go, and it's starting off as a runaway train which will soon be barreling down the tracks.

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  25. Are you on drugs? What Dem leader currently has called for what you call exemption, but is really an arbitrator who doesn't have to live with the settlements he mandates? What current Dem has asked for it? The answer is NO ONE. They control over 2/3 of the legislature in case you have forgotten. You are living in a dream world in your mind and think it's reality. Police and Fire love binding arbitration because it has sky rocketed their pay and benefits! Most Unions would take your binding arbitration suggestion in a heartbeat. Some Unions have fought to get that in their contracts.

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  26. Kid, you don't read. Go back and try it again.

    First, the writer clearly wrote AFTER the strike begins. Second, the writer mentions that after the strike happens [in earnest,] the public will be so outraged that they will be crying out for EXEMPTION–that means breaking down their representatives doors–duh!
    Third, the unions 'love' binding arbitration so much that that is why they want to strike. Yeah, forget the bridge. I'll sell you ALL of Alameda County–cheap!

    Clearly you are the one on drugs, and very bad ones at that. You need to leave the discussion, if one can even call it that, to those with intelligence and experience in these matters. You have neither. Please refrain from boring the readership with any further cocky comments. It really is past your bedtime.

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  27. You really don't know what you are talking about 4:53. You just make things up in your mind like a child who's dreaming. You're so arrogant but clearly not very informed. Go back to your La La land and dream on. Unions have a long history of fighting for binding arbitration, but management has fought to keep public employees from getting it because they lose control. Come back to the discussion after you take a course or two in labor studies.

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  28. The above brought to you courtesy of those who have not a clue and keep their 'intelligence' where the sun don't shine!

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  29. That above thought applies to you 8:28. It seems you are a legend in your own mind, but dreaming and wishing doesn't mean it will happen. I just want to be able to take BART to work, so I'm hoping for a compromise settlement, or the Gov. to impose a 60 day moratorium so I can do my job across the Bay in S.F.

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  30. Now kid, don't get upset now. While stealing my thoughts might be a form of flattery, it only cheapens you.

    The adults will work it out so that the union whores go exempt, and then you and your little kiddies can take the train without worry. You see, kid, we're all on the same team. The only difference is you don't understand adult realities. We'll take care of it so the big, bad union whores are put in their place–close to the third rail–and then everything will be o.k. for the public at large.

    Try to take a timeout while the adults get this taken care of. Nap time for you.

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  31. Keep living in a different world you fantasize, instead of reality, Anonymous above. You are like a child who doesn't understand politics or Sacramento. Compromise is the only realistic solution. You can hold your breath and stomp your feet but you still won't get your way. Grow up!

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  32. You're getting irritated, kid. The reason is that you are trying to get others to buy your fantasies about 'compromise.' Won't happen. Remember the old saying about a union whore in sheep's clothing–you're it.

    Exemption is going to happen, and it will be served up on a silver platter thanks to the out of control laborites. The 'SF Chronicle' has already run a story; KTVU has reported on exemption becoming more the buzz around Sacramento, and finally the latest poll released by KPIX today shows better than 3-1 public support for the position of BART management.

    You've lost and you are now shitting in your pants. Once the 'longest and bloodiest strike since the 1970s' begins all the dominoes fall.

    Very nice characterization OF YOURSELF above. Keep screaming 'compromise.' Yours is the only voice chanting code for giving the union whores the barn.

    Ain't happening in your lifetime!

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  33. FYI–compromise is the only solution–I'm not Union and I don't work for BART, but I do understand reality and don't think you do–calling people names and whining get us nowhere but stalemate. It does amuse me though.

    In Case You Missed It: East Bay Legislators Say Good-Faith Bargaining Must Underpin BART Negotiations

    Created on Friday, 02 August 2013 12:39
    (OAKLAND, CA) – In an op-ed appearing in the Bay Area News Group, State Assemblymembers Rob Bonta (D-Oakland), Nancy Skinner (D-Berkeley), and Bill Quirk (D-Hayward) addressed BART negotiations, calling for good-faith bargaining in order to reach a solution before the Sunday night deadline. The East Bay legislators highlighted workplace safety issues, missed revenue opportunities and the bargaining tactics of BART’s lead negotiator Thomas Hock.

    “Before the two sides lock heads again, it’s time for the Board to ask pointed questions about BART’s negotiating tactics, how it values safety and the potential for new revenue opportunities. Respect for the Bay Area working families who keep the trains running and get riders where they need to go needs to underpin these negotiations.

    Meanwhile, we in the State Assembly have asked the Joint Legislative Audit Committee to investigate BART’s financial status. It’s time for the numbers to come out, so that we can ensure that taxpayer dollars are being properly spent.

    With new information and a new perspective both sides have the opportunity to roll up their sleeves, bargain in good faith, and reach an agreement that provides all of us a stable and safe system.”

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  34. Thomas Hock, BART's $400,000 lead negotiator who just got back from a 10 day vacation, has a history of causing strikes. Since 2005, Hock has been involved in negotiations that have resulted in 7 transit strikes according to the newspaper. That doesn't sound like good faith bargaining on the part of BART management. I do believe our Governor will call for a 60 day moratorium either just before, or just after, the strike occurs. Thank you Jerry Brown.

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  35. The past two posts brought to you courtesy of the union whores, who continue to extort the public.

    It's all moving the public's way, kids. Latest 'Chronicle' poll–TODAY–continues to show mounting opposition to the extortionist unions. By the way, the question being asked of the public that is yielding such high numbers is should BART employees be prohibited from future strikes–read EXEMPTION. The numbers don't lie; overwhelmingly yes. MUNI once shilled your talk and now they are exempt. LA, Chicago, and New York subway are exempt to name just a few mass transit agencies.

    Sorry, kids. BART has long been the hold out and now the day of reckoning has arrived. Also, as for Bonta and termed-out loser Hockock mentioned above, I would expect nothing less of those union-owned stooges. I've always said, and repeat yet again, that once the 'longest, bloodiest strike since the 1970s' begins in earnest, you will see the Bay Area delegation reverse course so fast it will make your dicks drop off.

    As for Tom Hock, a good man, a great man. He more than deserved his vacation, which the union whores signed off on along with management before 'negotiations' ever began. Convenient to forget that little detail, eh, Josie HoMooney? The final nail is almost in the coffin, then all of you pretenders won't have to worry at all anymore.

    With the threat of strikes removed for all time, then they can have negotiations all their money-grubbing hands desire, and I'll sit back in comfort as the trains continue merrily along.

    Always for the public and against the union whores!

    John/Jane Q. Public

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  36. This past post was brought to you by the management whore and the anti union troll who seems to actually want a strike instead of a settlement. He can care less about the inconvenience to all the rest of us who have to take BART to work. Read the paper troll, and you will see everything said about Tom Hock is true. He has been involved in negotiations since 2005 that resulted in 7 transit strikes. Only the anti union troll would think he's a good man. Talk about a whore! LOL Compromise settlement IS the only solution to avoid a strike.

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  37. Nice post, Josie HoMooney. Your brand of compromise will put bocu public $$$ in your larded bank account.

    No, Josie. You'll take EXEMPTION and we'll continue to ride BART unimpeded. Bottom line is that you are about to be put in your place and the public will be the winners. In the meantime, I'm sure you're being productive by putting pins into your Tom Hock voodoo doll. Get real, you and your whores have lost the public's support bigtime. Your days are numbered.

    Once the whore you are, the penultimate whore you continue to be!

    The public will always be the winner, and at your expense, as it must be!

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  38. SF Chronicle–8-3-13

    I'll continue to post the new numbers as they continue to go through the roof in favor of EXEMPTION. Oh yeah!!

    Jane Q. Public

    Should BART unions be allowed to strike?
    Yes, transit workers should have the same rights as other union workers

    239 ( 18.5% )
    No, strikes by Muni and city firefighter unions are banned — BART should be too

    719 ( 55.8% )
    Yes, it’s the best leverage labor has in negotiations

    101 ( 7.8% )
    No, denying transit services is akin to taking hostages

    230 ( 17.8% )

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  39. And every poll taken that asks if both sides should give a little, or compromise, to get to a settlement and avoid a strike, gets an overwhelming majority vote. It all depends how you ask the question which of course you know, but won't admit. Still laughing at your feeble attempt to try and bully other posters.

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  40. You are pathetic. Even when the numbers are staring you front and center you don't even realize it's over.

    I'll do my part by updating the latest numbers so as to continue to rub it in. Er, make the point, rather.

    Jane Q. Public

    Like

  41. Just admit most of the public wants some sort of compromise to avoid a strike, no matter who they place most of the blame on, instead of being so stubborn.

    Like

  42. Agree with the above statement at 12:10. Both sides are at fault and I don't care who's most at fault. Just get the damn thing settled and over with. Stubbornness and both sides trying to bully the other got us into this mess. I just want to take BART to work on Monday! John Q Public

    Like

  43. After Exemption occurs, AKA COMPROMISE, you'll be able to take BART to work. We guarantee it.

    By the way, please stop using my husband's name to sign your statements. There is only one John Q. Public who speaks for the public, and I'm married to him.

    Jane Q. Public

    Like

  44. I guarantee there is no chance of exemption tonight or in the near future, but there is a chance of settlement by compromise. I heard Hock and the ATU union leader both say they were working towards that on TV today and tonight. Hope they get there, because unlike you, I actually need BART to get around and go to work. The real Public Citizen.

    Like

  45. I was hoping for a 60, but I'll take a 7–Thank you Jerry Brown–the public

    OAKLAND (CBS/AP) — Governor Jerry Brown has averted a strike of San Francisco’s Bay Area Rapid Transit system, promising riders a normal commute Monday morning.

    Late Sunday night Brown issued an order for a seven-day inquiry into the contract dispute that threatened to shut down one of the region’s major train lines.

    Like

  46. Jerry whores for the union trolls.

    Exemption is the only answer for the next time, and there will be a next time–next week even.

    John Q. Public
    Official representative of the non-union trolls public.

    Like

  47. You're a whore for the anti union trolls. See anyone can call people names. Add something intelligent to the conversation. We'll find out in a week if this is settled or not. I'm betting it will be, but probably not to either of our satisfactions. The difference is I have to ride BART and you don't. I'm signing off for a week or until this is settled one way or another. It was fun while it lasted, but at least I took BART to work today—-the public won for a while!

    I'll sign back on when the settlement is in place–take care.

    Like

  48. Exemption is coming, and yes unlike you, I do ride bart.

    It will be fantastic to never have to got through this again–just like MUNI, NY subway, Chicago subway, LA light rail, etc. Boy, those folks must be doing something right, and now it is finally BART's turn.

    All aboard the EXEMPTION express!

    Like

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