Sources: Alameda County Grand Jury Investigating Haggerty Over Land Deal

ALCO Supervisor Scott Haggerty
PHOTO/MTC

ALAMEDA COUNTY BOS | Alameda County Supervisor Scott Haggerty is the subject of a grand jury investigation for allegedly facilitating the sale of his Livermore home in 2007 to a buyer later approved by the county to purchase 12 acres of county-owned ranchland near Pleasanton, according to sources familiar with the inquiry.

The allegation, reported in December by the San Francisco Chronicle, was laid out by Haggerty’s long-time chief of staff Chris Gray in a $10 million legal complaint following his dismissal last summer.

Numerous sources tell The Citizen the Alameda County Grand Jury took on the complaint in January with the focus of the investigation primarily on Haggerty’s sale of his home in Livermore to Tri Valley developer John Wong. During the same month of the transaction, Wong was awarded the right to purchase a tract of land near Pleasanton from the county’s Surplus Property Authority. At the time of the transactions, Haggerty’s District 1 included Pleasanton. Following redistricting, he now represents Dublin, Pleasanton, Sunol and a majority of Fremont.

In addition, to Gray’s allegation of a quid pro quo between Haggerty and Wong, the complaint also includes claims Haggerty routinely filled incorrect economic interest reports with the Fair Political Practices Commission and mistreated staff.

In the past, the Alameda Grand Jury, which convenes throughout the year and whose proceedings are secret and members anonymous, has the power to investigate, among other subjects, allegations of misconduct by public officials, and exist as a type of overseer of county and local government. Because of the whistleblower nature of some allegations investigated by the grand jury it declined to answer inquiries into whether it was currently investigating Gray’s claims against Haggerty.

A recent grand jury report issued in June of last year, for instance, was highly critical of the county’s handling of a little-known anti-poverty agency, called the Associated Community Action Program (ACAP). The organization was later dissolved following criminal allegations against its executive director and a lack of county oversight by its governing board comprised of council members and mayors from every city in Alameda County, excluding Oakland and Berkeley.

The grand jury has also come down hard in the past year on the physical deterioration of the delinquent youth facility Camp Wilmot Sweeney in San Leandro and the need for improved crime labs in Oakland and Alameda County.

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