Parker opens a new front: Releases website, mailer attacking Miley’s record

A mailer released Friday by Parker’s campaign
charges Miley with a cozy relationship with 
Corizon, the county’s prison health care provider.

ALCO BOARD OF SUPERVISORS | DISTRICT 4 |
Things just got real in Alameda County’s under-the-radar Board of Supervisors race following the release Thursday of a scathing website from Bryan Parker’s campaign asserting incumbent Nate Miley’s uses his office to benefit himself.

The website, nateisinitfornate.com, represents a clear change in tone for Parker’s campaign, which has proven adept recently in building significant momentum in advance of the June 7 winner-take-all primary.

In addition, to an ability to attract large amounts of campaign contributions, Parker secured the potentially game-changing endorsement of East Bay Rep. Eric Swalwell two weeks ago.

Among other talking points contained on the website and companion mailer sent to voters Friday is an instance when Miley supported a no-bid $237 million contract to the vendor providing health care services for county inmates while also receiving thousands in campaign donations.

The site also renews questions over Miley’s insistence to pay half of his dues at the Claremont Club with campaign funds and highlights over $21,000 in campaign funds used to pay his child for their work on his campaigns.

“This isn’t personal. It’s cited and backed by facts,” said Parker. “It’s not a flattering record, but it’s his record.”

East Bay politicos might find the use of an online hit piece familiar. In April 2014, Parker’s current campaign manager used a similar strategy to torpedo former Assemblymember Mary Hayashi’s bid for the state Senate.

The website, mugshotmary.com, succinctly highlighted Hayashi’s infamous theft at Neiman Marcus in San Francisco. The site and surveillance video of Hayashi stealing three articles of clothing went far in denying her a place in the November general election that year.

Miley’s campaign did not respond for comment.

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