Whites powering Alameda council candidate’s campaign

Alameda council candidate Jennifer Roloff
placed this ad in the local weekly last week.
(CLICK TO ENLARGE)

ALAMEDA CITY COUNCIL |
ELECTION 2016 |
Last summer, Republican Speaker Paul Ryan triumphantly tweeted a selfie celebrating the outgoing class of House interns. Rows and rows of white faces smiled back in photo later widely derided for its lack of diversity.

Readers of the Alameda Sun last week were greeted by a similarly telling photo. This time, an newspaper advertisement for Alameda City Council candidate Jennifer Roloff featuring dozens of her supporters, but save for possibly one person, entirely older, white Alamedans. The half-page ad includes the tagline, “Progress+Preservation.”

But the ad might not even be the most alarming moment in Roloff’s first-time campaign. In August, Roloff raised many eyebrows when she told members of the Alameda Democratic Club that she supported militarizing Alameda’s police force.

In response to the question “Do you know what military equipment we’ve purchase?” she portrayed the atmosphere outside of Alameda in dangerous terms.

“I think it’s very relevant to what is going on in neighboring cities. I think we’re fortunate enough to not have an exacerbated, similar situation, but I do think that we need to partner with out neighboring communities to make sure that we’re cognizant of the risks that could come to the city and being prepared for such issues. I think that Alamedans don’t have to feel the protection of the police yet, but what’s going on out there, I think we need to start getting prepared. We should work with our public safety to get better prepared for what could happen,” said Roloff.

“As far as the equipment, I do know that Alameda has its own equipment and we do end up lending it out to nearby cities. But I do think we should work with those nearby cities so we can capitalize on the equipment they have to have as much preparedness as possible.”

Roloff later backtracked from the statement in an letter to a local newspaper.

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