Embattled Alameda County Auditor Candidate Withdraws from the Race

Kathleen Knox ends her campaign for
auditor, but her name remains on the ballot.

ALAMEDA COUNTY | Kathleen Knox, the candidate for Alameda County auditor-controller who was charged earlier this month with six felony counts of voter fraud, has withdrawn from the race less than three weeks from Election Day.

“I am officially and respectfully withdrawing my candidacy for Alameda County Auditor-Controller,” Knox said in a statement Friday. “The distractions of the current events have become overwhelming and my focus now needs to be entirely on my family, my business and my private life.”

Knox also thanked her supporters and acknowledged all the voters she met over the last two months of her short campaign to replace long-time auditor Patrick O’Connell, who announced in February he would not seek re-election.

“I continue to believe in strong and honest government; this includes the electoral process for which I am so grateful to have been a part of. As the first woman to run for this position and the first to challenge this position in almost 30 years, I only hope that I am not the last. I encourage other to participate and to make a difference.”

A pre-trial hearing in Alameda County Superior Court held Thursday in Oakland was rescheduled for June 18 following charges Knox misrepresented her residency in Alameda County. Investigators said Knox actually lives in Contra Costa County, but listed an assisted-living facility she runs in San Leandro on campaign forms last March. She was charged with registering as an ineligible voter, perjury and fraudulent voting and plead not guilty.

Knox, who is the daughter of former Alameda County Supervisor Robert Knox, however, will continue to appear on the June 3 ballot along with the only other candidate in the race, Alameda County Chief Deputy Auditor Steve Manning. If Knox were to win the primary, but found ineligible by the court, the Alameda County Board of Supervisors could make an appointment followed by a special election, as early as November.